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cautrell05
06-03-2010, 01:17 AM
Finally switching over from street tires to mod tires. Was talking with some of the guys and they said they were told to run new tires on the left side and put some heat in them for hot laps and the heat race and then take them off for the feature and then next week run them where ever they want. Something about being too soft when new and the heat cycle makes them a little more durable. They said that one of the guys in town takes his and bakes them in a paint booth to cure them then runs them. Any of that make any sense to you guys? Kinda sounds like a load of crap to me but ive never ran mod tires before so ill admit that I know next to nothing about them

Nick

hogracer3d
06-03-2010, 03:01 AM
We are on them as well this year (3-link) with 20", and it actually free'd us up.

what you will miss is the side bite.

we grind the pizz out of them

Here is our $3K win on a glassy track on the G-60's

http://vimeo.com/12240350

I'll PM you

stock car driver
06-03-2010, 08:58 AM
Finally switching over from street tires to mod tires. Was talking with some of the guys and they said they were told to run new tires on the left side and put some heat in them for hot laps and the heat race and then take them off for the feature and then next week run them where ever they want. Something about being too soft when new and the heat cycle makes them a little more durable. They said that one of the guys in town takes his and bakes them in a paint booth to cure them then runs them. Any of that make any sense to you guys? Kinda sounds like a load of crap to me but ive never ran mod tires before so ill admit that I know next to nothing about them

Nick

Not true at all. They are not too soft unless you sipe them too much. They also dont get any harder with heat cycles. Ive got some that are 5 nights old and they durometer the same as NEW.

blncfn57
06-04-2010, 10:13 PM
Finally switching over from street tires to mod tires. Was talking with some of the guys and they said they were told to run new tires on the left side and put some heat in them for hot laps and the heat race and then take them off for the feature and then next week run them where ever they want. Something about being too soft when new and the heat cycle makes them a little more durable. They said that one of the guys in town takes his and bakes them in a paint booth to cure them then runs them. Any of that make any sense to you guys? Kinda sounds like a load of crap to me but ive never ran mod tires before so ill admit that I know next to nothing about them

Nick

What type of mod tires you talking about??

cautrell05
06-04-2010, 11:24 PM
What type of mod tires you talking about??

What ever hoosier the imca mod tire is.

I have heard from a couple of guys about the lack of sidebite compared to the street tires but I have heard from other guys that they just stick better in general unless your in mud or marbles. Cant complain about the weight savings though.

Nick

gun91
06-06-2010, 06:40 PM
What ever hoosier the imca mod tire is.

I have heard from a couple of guys about the lack of sidebite compared to the street tires but I have heard from other guys that they just stick better in general unless your in mud or marbles. Cant complain about the weight savings though.

Nick


Do you have to run the hoosiers? If not get the American Racer G-60s much better tire IMO

Hillbilly Deluxe
06-08-2010, 09:27 AM
Baking them in a paint booth is not going to put a heat cycle in them unless the paint booth got up to around 250* - 350* and unless you have rollers which spins the tires while they bake.

Someone I know, has a oven built right into the hauler that has that exact same set up. A propane burner and oven controls and a electric motor and rollers that spins the tires. They win a lot of features with those tires.

gun91
06-08-2010, 09:31 AM
Baking them in a paint booth is not going to put a heat cycle in them unless the paint booth got up to around 250* - 350* and unless you have rollers which spins the tires while they bake.

Someone I know, has a oven built right into the hauler that has that exact same set up. A propane burner and oven controls and a electric motor and rollers that spins the tires. They win a lot of features with those tires.


Be willing to be that they ain't heat treating them to make them harder!!

Bet they are cooking tire softner in them!!

flagone
06-08-2010, 10:05 AM
This is all you need to have. Well worth the price. The siper is awesome.

http://eaglemfg.net/

Hillbilly Deluxe
06-10-2010, 05:24 PM
Be willing to be that they ain't heat treating them to make them harder!!

Bet they are cooking tire softner in them!!

Heat treat is a machine shop term where you heat up a piece of metal to a prescribed temperature for a prescribed amount of time - which causes the metal to have a case on the outside of the metal which is only a couple of thousandths thick which makes the metal act as if it was made of a harder metal - but allows the softer metal inside of the case to keep it's properties.


The proper term is putting a heat cycle in the tires. Where you know at which temperature - the tire gets when you race with it and by putting a heat cycle in the tire it does not make it softer - but harder, which will allow the tire to wear more evenly because the harder the tire is - the longer it will last on an abrasive surface. At the same time a fresh tire will have an increased amount of wear due to the fact that the tire - new - is soft and it will give up alot of it's rubber the first time or two you use it.

The goal is to get the tire hot and make it a little more hard, but at the same time make it more consistent so it doesn't give up during the race.
Most if not all Late Model Racers I know - only uses the tire one or maybe two times and that is in a 25 or 30 lap feature. Two nights and then the tire is bawld.

My goal was to find a brand new tire that was grooved and siped that was baked and then got a flat and they took it off and I was able to buy new tires that I didn't have to do anything to except patch the hole for say $20 each. The race team was more then glad to get rid of it and I was more than glad to get it. The expensive part was when you had to use tubes and someone cut down your tire doing something stupid and now you not only lost the new tire - but also the new tube. It just made it twice as expensive.

Hillbilly Deluxe
06-10-2010, 05:28 PM
When you put a heat cycle into the tire, it is less susceptible to chunking and loosing a large amount of tread during a race.

Many times I have seen good late model racers loose a race because they drove too hard too early and they tore up their tires and with only a couple of laps to go - the tire blew out and went flat and they lost the race - not because they didn't have the best car or driver - but because their tire management did not make it to the end of the race.

Any dummy can stand on the pedal and turn left, a smart racer takes care of his equipment and makes sure that he / she can make it all the way to the end of the race. The only lap that pays anything is the last one!:)

gun91
06-11-2010, 12:31 AM
Baking them in a paint booth is not going to put a heat cycle in them unless the paint booth got up to around 250* - 350* and unless you have rollers which spins the tires while they bake.

Someone I know, has a oven built right into the hauler that has that exact same set up. A propane burner and oven controls and a electric motor and rollers that spins the tires. They win a lot of features with those tires.


What you described here sounds more like a "hot box". Some racers use these to "cook" a tire treatment into the tires to make them softer. Not saying your wrong, but I have heard and seen this done A LOT more than heating them to harden a tire!! If you know what your doing you can treat the tire just enough to soften it to "fire it off" and have a good soft tire at the start of the race, but get down to the harder rubber later in the race that will last. Also the softer rubber will burn off during the race and the tire will still durometer hard enough in tech after the race.

Seems to me that it would have to be a LONG race to want to harden a tire. Unless maybe you bought too soft of tires to begin with or something.

Hillbilly Deluxe
06-11-2010, 07:01 AM
Where we race - there is no rules per se - as per which tire you must use or how hard it has to be.

What you learn by experience is that you want to use as soft of a tire as possible for the heat race - to get a good starting position for the feature.

If the line up is determined by a dice roll or by pulling a number, then it doesn't matter which tire you use for the heat race anyways.

For the feature - you want to use a tire that is harder, because the track will dry out and become more abrasive. The goal is to figure out which tire has the best traction and use it with the right amount of air pressure.

The person I know that uses what you call a hot box - does not treat his tires with any sort of compound to make the tires softer - because there is no rules - as to how hard or soft they must be.

You can drive to Lias tire and buy all the American Racer Tires - of any size, hardness or tread design as you wish. The trick is to match the right tire to the right circumstance.

I knew several drivers who attended the Hillbilly one year that ran D -55 tires in the feature. The one thing that the Hillbilly was famous for was dust and a dried out track and tore up tires.

The same is true for local short tracks such as Dog Hollow - which tears tires right off the rims. You almost need a new set of tires every time you go there.