PDA

View Full Version : Plastic brake lines .



turner
06-17-2010, 04:33 PM
Has anyone used plastic brake lines on a metric street stock(3200 lbs).I have heard that they work good , and i heard to never use plastic, so im confused.Any advise is appreciated .Thanks alot .

Egoracing
06-17-2010, 06:25 PM
Ran them on Modifieds and street stocks on dirt and asphalt. Not one problem when they are run correctly.

hogracer3d
06-17-2010, 06:55 PM
I run aluminum, but I have a friend who has run them for many years on his SS and Mod, no problems for either of us

turner
06-17-2010, 07:25 PM
Thanks alot for the info guys.Its greatly appreciated.

bushracing67
06-17-2010, 09:26 PM
i run them, last car were 50+ races old, only ever had one break, the upper a frame broke and cut the line, prolly would have cut a steel line too, it was a nasty wreck lol

fast_crew
06-17-2010, 09:34 PM
Thanks alot for the info guys.Its greatly appreciated.

Be sure to check track rules alot of tracks don't allow them.

500BOMBER
07-18-2010, 03:46 PM
I had a sudden fuel leak (carb fitting) on my modified one night, caught fire big time. It took out the brake lines so fast that I could'nt stop the car. Fire was lickin' at my face, so I bailed out while the car was still rollin'. I'll never use plastic brake lines on ANYTHING again.

Egoracing
07-18-2010, 03:55 PM
I had a sudden fuel leak (carb fitting) on my modified one night, caught fire big time. It took out the brake lines so fast that I could'nt stop the car. Fire was lickin' at my face, so I bailed out while the car was still rollin'. I'll never use plastic brake lines on ANYTHING again.

If you are using the braided stainless lines from the chassis to the master cylinder then you are using plastic lines. If you ran them unprotected aluminum lines would burn up also. We used them for years with zero issues, used common sense running them and protect them and you are good.

stockcar5
07-18-2010, 04:38 PM
If you are using the braided stainless lines from the chassis to the master cylinder then you are using plastic lines.

like you said ego..the lines are covered in stainless braiding! i guess they will eventually melt but you'd have plenty of time to stop the car long before they melt.

it comes down to a safety issue. there is no performance advantage and both steel and plastic can be installed in quickly. if anything the plastic might take more time to run properly and protect it from potential fire. you dont hafta worry about where they run with steel lines.

Egoracing
07-18-2010, 04:41 PM
The braid is for abrasion only and will melt the lines as fast as with nothing, Especially if they have a flammable liquid on them.

stockcar5
07-19-2010, 12:46 AM
so if i put heat to a plastic line and a stainless line at the same time you're saying they will melt at the same time? i'm no scientist but i'd love to see proof of that.

500BOMBER
07-19-2010, 09:07 PM
If you are using the braided stainless lines from the chassis to the master cylinder then you are using plastic lines. If you ran them unprotected aluminum lines would burn up also. We used them for years with zero issues, used common sense running them and protect them and you are good.

Did'nt have trouble with the braided lines, it was the lines running along the chassis that fried in a big hurry. Also, think about it...when a plastic line has a sudden 1200 degrees of FIRE on it and then you subject it to around 2000 lbs of internal pressure,uuuhhh...guess what happens?

cautrell05
07-19-2010, 09:19 PM
The only brake line failures I remember at out track were plastic lines. Every latemodel driver that I have talked to with them said the pedal was mushy with them too. Of all the places on the car to save weight, brake lines are not the place to mess around with. Just go steel and forget about it. That 3 or 4 pounds isnt worth it.

Nick

turner
07-19-2010, 10:09 PM
Hey Nick..Not looking to save any weight.My last car had great brakes with the stock master cylinder/booster.Then i took off the booster, and never had good brakes after that.I cant run aftermarket master cylinders, so i need a master cylinder that will work that is an oem style.I did get your info Nick.Thanks for the info.I apprreciate it.Anyone else run oem master cylinders, and if so what kind???

ENFORCER CHASSIS
07-19-2010, 10:31 PM
i used manual brake master cylinder off of 80's model s-10 trucks.
Hey Nick..Not looking to save any weight.My last car had great brakes with the stock master cylinder/booster.Then i took off the booster, and never had good brakes after that.I cant run aftermarket master cylinders, so i need a master cylinder that will work that is an oem style.I did get your info Nick.Thanks for the info.I apprreciate it.Anyone else run oem master cylinders, and if so what kind???

dirty white boy
07-20-2010, 12:42 AM
80,000 pound semis use plastic lines for air brakes.

sure do,...but never see over a 150 psi,..of air,sure that be a lil defferant with fluid,..but thats exactly what im fixin to plum my car with,...since i my boss got 5 big roles from 1/4 to 3/4 line an a ton of fittings!!

cautrell05
07-20-2010, 03:18 AM
80,000 pound semis use plastic lines for air brakes.

Feel free to research how airbrakes actually work.

cautrell05
07-20-2010, 01:08 PM
i have fixed enough air lines on semis for the last 20 some years, i don't think i need to do any researching.

If that were true than you would know that first of all there is a big difference between 150 psi and 600.
Plus if you loose pressure on an air brake system the brakes lock. on a hydraulic system you dont stop. slight difference there.

Im not gonna get in a pissing match here. You wont to run them go ahead. Dont mean $hit to me. I just know in 15 years I have never seen a steel line melt, burst from welding splatter or push out of a fitting. EVER.

Nick

Egoracing
07-20-2010, 06:58 PM
so if i put heat to a plastic line and a stainless line at the same time you're saying they will melt at the same time? i'm no scientist but i'd love to see proof of that.

The braided chassis to caliper lines are not stainless it is the same nylon line in a CHEAP stainless braid to protect it. Here it is straight from Speedway Motors site:
Braided stainless covering over a Teflon inner liner. These are perfect for brake lines, clutch lines and gauge lines. These have straight AN3 or AN 4 fittings on both ends.
Is that enough proof? It is the SAME line that they sell in the chassis kit with an open braid meaning that a flaming liquid will go right through them. This is why many asphalt series do not allow them because brake dust fires will melt them at the caliper.
I have seen a steel line pop from weld spatter hitting it and I have seen aluminum and steel split along a seam. Most of the plastic lines has a burst pressure in the 1900-2000 psi range. Any idea what the burst pressure of stock over the counter steel lines are? Some "Steel" parts store lines have failed at 7-900psi and this can be found with a little research. Also most car accidents where break failure played a part are due to corrosion and temp induced brake line failure so it can happen on steel lined cars also. Indy and F-1 cars use nylon and that is where it got its start in racing. It is like anything else in racing, be a fool and use it incorrectly and you are going to get hurt. Use it the way it was intended and you are safe. Just like the people that argue that pipe benders are good for tubing or that a 110 stick welder can do just as good welding their chassis as a 220 volt mig, they will argue about everything.

cautrell05
07-20-2010, 07:16 PM
i never said run them or dont run them, it was just something to think about that semis run plastic air lines. i have also driven over 2 million miles, so i have backed up more miles then you have gone forward, so i know what happens when there is a loss of air pressure. im sick of 4m because most people on here like you are a wanna be think you know it all expert. so what do you mean if that were true, have you drove an 18 wheeler and have the brakes lock up, do you think the truck just stops and thats it.

Oh god here we go again. The whole reason we got side tracked on this is because you mentioned that trucks use plastic air brake line in a discussion about using plastic hydraulic line in a street stock. They have nothing in common other than they are part of the brake system.

Just out of curiosity, exactly how many miles have I driven sinse 1990? I find it pretty hard to believe that you have backed up more than I have driven forward. While I have no doubt that you have backed up alot, I really doubt it is more than I have driven forward. Comments like that will not get you taken seriously by anyone.

As far as being a wannabe, I have been racing for 15 years or so, have been master ase certified for 12 and in a gm dealership for 7. Pretty sure I have a little bit of a clue.

the husband of a gal I used to work with used to drive trucks. After a while he had back issues and they put him in the office as a dispatcher and to recieve calls when drivers had problems. One day he had a guy call in with a brand new kenworth and said he had low oil pressure. Dispatcher asked if the oil was full. Driver said I dont know, ill check and call back. 15 min later he calls back and asks how to open the hood. The dispatcher tells him to go to the shop 2 miles up the road and have them check it.

The point? Just because you drive trucks doesent automatically make you a mechanical expert. It just means you know how to drive. Maybe you do know some, maybe you dont. I dont care. Bringing up plastic air brake lines in a hydraulic brake discussion kinda makes me think you dont. Whatever. Im done poluting this guys thread with your crap.

Nick

stockcar5
07-20-2010, 07:30 PM
The line is not stainless it is plastic in a CHEAP stainless braid to protect it.

i know the line is plastic inside stainless braiding...thats why i dont see your reasoning that both lines will both melt the same when one is protected and one is not. i've got some old line laying around and may just test your theory if i get bored. unfortunately i got 5 races this weekend so i might not get bored :)

Egoracing
07-21-2010, 05:50 PM
The braid is ONLY for rock rotection the inside line will melt at exactly the same temp that the line without the braid will.

500BOMBER
07-21-2010, 08:52 PM
The only brake line failures I remember at out track were plastic lines. Every latemodel driver that I have talked to with them said the pedal was mushy with them too. Of all the places on the car to save weight, brake lines are not the place to mess around with. Just go steel and forget about it. That 3 or 4 pounds isnt worth it.

Nick

Ditto on the mushy pedal.

Chasisguy7
07-21-2010, 09:50 PM
A great deal is speedway motors brake line kit if your plumbing a car. It comes with steel line and 4 braided lines and all the fittings for a hundred bucks I think and you should have a couple of fittings left over great deal and its steel.

tucker71
07-22-2010, 03:55 PM
thats were i got the plastic lines that i had on my modified. had good brakes and never had any trouble out of them. sure beat having to bend lines. never had a mushy peddle.

roybeckett13j
07-23-2010, 12:45 PM
I run plastic, with stainless for the flex lines. Good thing about plastic, if they break you can just pull a fitting out of your trailer and patch it back together. If an stainless line breaks, you have to replace the whole line, not just patch it.

I've had tires come apart, and shread a stainless line, didn't have an extra and was out for the night. If it was plastic it could of been fixed in minutes.

If the car catxhes fire, melts the line, shut the engine off and use the clutch to stop the car!

RCJ
07-23-2010, 12:48 PM
I've been using them for years.Keep a spare kit in the trailer,if you crash and rip a bunch of stuff off you can have it fixed real quick.Every winter I throw the old lines away and put new ones on.

stockcar5
07-23-2010, 01:31 PM
i dont know about your guys cars but on mine if i get hit hard enough to break a steel line (which is VERY hard to do since they bend so well) my frame is probably in a u-shape and getting back out there is my last priority!

500BOMBER
07-23-2010, 04:04 PM
If the car catxhes fire, melts the line, shut the engine off and use the clutch to stop the car!

That works just fine in a "normal" situation. Try that when your getting your tearoffs melted off and your beard is on fire!:eek:

roybeckett13j
07-23-2010, 10:03 PM
That works just fine in a "normal" situation. Try that when your getting your tearoffs melted off and your beard is on fire!:eek:

That's why you wear a head sock!

metricss
07-26-2010, 11:44 PM
not sure why u would want plastic brake line on a racecar??? maybe its just me, but i ran the high nickel content ez bend line. comes in 25 foot roll, and just cut and flare as needed. has very good corrosion resistance, and will last way longer than the cheap steel line from parts store. i would never plumb a chassis with anything but quality steel line. im just saying if i need to stop my car because my car is on fire then i dont want anything but. plus if debris was to hit my steel line it wouldnt be likely to puncture it.