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Thread: let's chat

  1. #121

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    Anybody running inside bead locks on the left rear? I see some people running them but we never have. We are running 5 to 6 lbs in left rear and havenít had any problems. Are some going lower than that?

  2. #122
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    May 2007
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    Kansas
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    It's not about running lower pressure, it's about when the track is rough and you hit a hole with the LR and pull the tire off the bead.

    Many only have a few or just one of those inner beadlocks and just run it when needed to save expense of buying numerous ones to run all the time. If your budget allows it, then no reason not to have several . . . but most aren't on those types of budgets.

  3. #123
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    Oct 2007
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    spiderma4 asked--
    how much are engines being tipped back? i am at about 2.2 degrees rear up at ride height and about 3.4 rear up at rocked over

    I do not have a number to answer that with but it is enough that can be noticed just by eye
    my guess would be 2 1/2 degrees

    Brad
    www.race-1.com

  4. #124

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    thanks brad. do u think that's because of carb issues or changing the engine to pinion angle?

  5. #125
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    Oct 2007
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    I would say their intentions were originally surrounded around the driveshaft angle but it sure didn't hurt the carburetor situation any

    Brad
    www.race-1.com

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiderma4 View Post
    how much are engines being tipped back? iam at about 2.2 degrees rear up at ride height and about 3.4 rear up at rocked over
    An XR1 is 1.8 degrees with left frame rail level like on jack stands. That is going off the crankshaft centerline not the intake.

  7. #127

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    thanks billet. I have a question for u if I run the motor down in the back say .5 to 1 degree rocked over and I run my pinion at about 3 to 4 degrees and assuming I get between 4 and 5 degrees of climb so I end up 1 to 2 degrees up would I have any issues I might be overlooking?

  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiderma4 View Post
    thanks billet. I have a question for u if I run the motor down in the back say .5 to 1 degree rocked over and I run my pinion at about 3 to 4 degrees and assuming I get between 4 and 5 degrees of climb so I end up 1 to 2 degrees up would I have any issues I might be overlooking?
    Not enough starting pinion angle, IMO

    Remember, just letting the rear end drop roughly 4" or so is going to pinion up the rear end due to the torque arm being hooked to the 6th coil 40" or so forward. That in itself pinions up the rear end about 6 degree's and you haven't applied any power to it yet to compress the 5th coil some and pinion up even more. So say 3" out of the torque arm spring and your now over 11 degree's.

    You really need to have an idea of the travels on everything from data acquisition and run the car thru the motions. Just having travel indicators for rough travels doesn't tell you when the car is up in back and what position the 5th or 6th coil is in, the car may be fully hiked on rear and stays there on the brakes hard where the 6th coil compresses to the max or the car may come down when on the brakes. So without that data on the car it's hard to say what the pinion angle is at different times. I can tell you it gets way more out of wack then people would believe, so much so most think I'm lying.

  9. #129
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    Oct 2007
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    this subject of driveline angles and so fourth are not at all anything that I can add content to with specifics but I had a customer that was continuously having driveshaft failures in a modified (4 link car) he put a go pro camera on the torque arm where you could see the action of the arm and the pinion----all I can say is in his case talking in tenths of a degree would not be relevant---it was big numbers ---it was much more movement than I would ever had imagined

    Brad
    www.race-1.com

  10. #130
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    below is something that I copied from another board ---I don't think the guy that posted it actually wrote it but is a very interesting read----it's a little long and really you have to read it a couple times to actually follow it but I think it can certainly help some young drivers

    Brad
    www.race-1.com



    I don't separate a corner into entry, apex and exit though there is still entry, a moving/changing apex and an exit dirt oval racing. I seperate the corner into four functions instead of parts:

    1. The moment of turn in or the start of the corner. Usually you'll hear it's the LF that starts you into the corner but anything driver input, the bank of the track, changes in grip, etc., all can get you started into the corner. The start of the corner is something which causes the initial weight transfer from left to right and back to front, which is needed during the corner.

    2. Next comes the needed control of weight transfer to the right which will cause your tires to operate for the next phase or function in the corner which is maintaining momentum. I often say and explain that if two racers on a track have identical equipment and potential with all other things being equal the driver who can maintain the most momentum between the moment of turn in and the start of acceleration will be the fastest.

    The momentum portion of the turn is a must to be fast. Enhancing it is what always has lead to the old saying of "slow down to go fast". It is the portion of the turn which includes what left and right racings calls the apex and if used properly 'cannot' be used for acceleration.

    If you get on the gas beyond what is needed to set your momentum speed or remain on the gas beyond your limit of grip during this part of the turn, it will mean a loss of over all speed. If you can accelerate during this part of the turn it means you have more grip that can be used to maintain additional momentum. Instead of the pedal to the metal you should be using the additional available grip to maintain more momentum.

    3. Once you have completed maintaining momentum which may have been very short or though a long portion of the turn depending on track configuration and how your choosing your line on the track, the start of acceleration begins. It's the start of acceleration which determines the start of exit and the start of exit is not the completion of a turn but 'another' turn. The start of acceleration should be taken and considered using items 1 and 2 above no matter how short, quick or gradual you start your acceleration. It's also often said turn exit is determined by entry. Yes it is with the addition of how your maintaining momentum portion of the turn sets you position on the track for the start of acceleration. If you have set entry and maintaining momentum to include enough of the over all turning needed to complete the overall turn, your transitioning to acceleration while exiting will be mild because you do not have excessive turning to do while exiting.

    4. The final phase or function needed is to accelerate. If you have maintained momentum and completed enough of the overall turning during 1 and 2 you will be able to maximize acceleration based on how little turning you have to do while accelerating.

    How fast you can come off the corner depends on how long a straight your position on the track gives you. It also depends on if your acceleration can take advantage of gravity traveling down the track. And it most importantly depends on how much of the over all turning at an end of the track or each of the four corners you have left to do while accelerating. The more turning you have left the less you will be able to accelerate.

    If written correctly all of the above should lead to thoughts of how usually through most of the physical distance at each end of the track you cannot accelerate. If you can't accelerate then you must be either slowing down or maintaining momentum. Fast becomes who can maintain the most momentum and best put themselves in a position to accelerate in the straightest line. The only trade offs to 1, 2, 3 and 4 above are racing trade offs where to gain position you must lessen your use of one of the above. A slide job which gets you from point A to B quicker but causes you to also slow down because you did not complete enough turning before needing to accelerate is a good example.

    There is one and only one possible option beyond the go pedal to increase your speed during the momentum portion of the turn. It occurs when you use the grip available after initial turn in not to maximize momentum speed but to change your position on the track. If you increase your turning you or tighten your turn while maintaining momentum, the additional turning will increase over all speed the same as an ice skater spinning increases speed when they pull their arms in tighter. Those viewing result when well done will be not only seeing what's racing accelerate down the bank of the track but sort of shoot down the bank of the track. You can also use tightening a turn to increase your momentum speed depending on track conditions by how tight or tightening of the turn you make the or make an extended initial turn in. It's what your often seeing when you see something sort of accelerate into the turn and it best shows itself asphalt oval racing. It's all about how a skilled driver can choose to use the momentum maintaining portion of all turns to both position themselves for exit and control their ability to accelerate on exit.

  11. #131
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    Oct 2007
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    I spent last week in Indianapolis at the PRI show and more than ever did I witness the gadget of the day--LOL
    It is hard not to get wrapped up in some of this stuff but if you take the time to pick it apart and understand as much about the gadget as possible then it becomes productive to quiz and test the schooled sales people that are doing their absolute best to make you think they can give you incredible gains in power.

    3 solid days of working the show hard and I have 2 "gadgets" that interest me
    not saying I am sold or will be promoting this stuff---I am just interested and will look into them deeper before even bringing them to the table for discussion or open testing

    anyone attending that venue out there has to be cautious of the trick of the day

    Brad
    www.race-1.com

  12. #132

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    I see all these people going to the Profab Headers, they sure are pretty and appear to be very well constructed but is there really that much difference in power gain vs Beyea? The Profabs are triple the price at just under 2k for a set.Brad, have you or anyone you know of tested these or seen the power curve on a Dyno yet?

  13. #133
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    I have not seen any direct comparison testing published by anyone and truthfully I don't think I would give it much merit even if I did --(know matter who it favors)

    all good companies know their strengths and weaknesses
    they build on their strengths and work on their weaknesses
    this is not something that is prompted by another company with a new product
    it is something that we do everyday

    Race-1 is going to stick with Beyea as together we are able to customize the header system to fit the driver's style and program

    Brad
    www.race-1.com

  14. #134
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    111

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    I spoke with the ProFab guy at a motorsports show last year. He said they had dyno'd a set at Hendren on Dillion Brown's 604 car and there was a gain of 5 HP. Didn't say where that HP was in the RPM range or if it would be beneficial.

  15. #135

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    The way I look at a bunch of this stuff is where are my dollars best spent. You could take the extra money those things cost and buy a couple new tires and be faster or if you donít have any spares buy some spare front end parts with the money. Iíd rather be racing with 5 hp less than on the trailer because I didnít have parts to make repairs after a heat race skirmish. Just my 2 cents worth

  16. #136
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    Sep 2007
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    What about kevko oil evacuation kits? R they worth it?

  17. #137
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    thedirtysouth
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    i think so , i have been using there oil pans for several years and there 2nd to none,,,,,,IMO,,,

  18. #138

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    Brad, thanks for your response and a wise choice, beyea makes a great product and are affordable.Doyle, you are correct, Iíll keep my set of $640 Beyeaís and spend the other $1360 somewhere else

  19. #139
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    Oct 2007
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    Dirtslinger
    whatever brand of header that is being run---if they are a season old or more and steel they can be perked up some
    simply have the inside of the tube blasted and then a coating applied---yes that can run about $300 but it will be noticeable from the seat
    If coatings are not in the budget---apply automatic transmission fluid to the inside of the header for a couple of days and then install them on the car and smoke out the neighbors---once the smoke stops the inside of the tube will have a new finish and last for a reasonable amount of time (they still need to be blasted first)

    steel headers will build up with rust and degrade the exhaust flow over time
    stainless headers do not have this issue and run pretty much the same their entire life

    beyea makes a budget minded stainless header by cutting back on the pretty stuff
    they are mig welded and not polished
    they do also offer a tig welded version that is polished for the folks with a larger budget
    however most will stick with mild steel and save enough for 2 sets of tires or go with mig welded and save enough for one set of tires

    It's funny how some of us describe funds
    I have been in this business for 40 years and solely in the engine business for 14 years and I still compare available funds to tires--LOL

    Merry Christmas
    Brad
    www.race-1.com
    Last edited by brad hibbard; 12-22-2019 at 10:29 AM.

  20. #140

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    Brad, What is your take on Brisk sparkplugs?
    Thanks in advance! appreciated

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