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Thread: Investment

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    216

    Default Investment

    02 Mastersbilt 2x2 wide/combo with RR rail notched for tire clearance. Steel block, 650-700 hp engine. Usually run used tires except for occasional new RR. Finally figured out how to drive and get car to handle decent. Can finally hang with mid pack during feature.

    Assuming about $3k available to invest, where should I invest? Lots of new tires? Lightening all rotating stuff (rotors, low friction bearings/races, etc). Shocks (Running afco DA's all four corners).

    It's not enough obviously for new frame, and I don't have the knowledge or adequate tools to clip the car correctly.

    Just looking to improve. Buying fancy stuff before would have been a waste as I couldn't drive the car right.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dfhotlm33c View Post
    02 Mastersbilt 2x2 wide/combo with RR rail notched for tire clearance. Steel block, 650-700 hp engine. Usually run used tires except for occasional new RR. Finally figured out how to drive and get car to handle decent. Can finally hang with mid pack during feature.

    Assuming about $3k available to invest, where should I invest? Lots of new tires? Lightening all rotating stuff (rotors, low friction bearings/races, etc). Shocks (Running afco DA's all four corners).

    It's not enough obviously for new frame, and I don't have the knowledge or adequate tools to clip the car correctly.

    Just looking to improve. Buying fancy stuff before would have been a waste as I couldn't drive the car right.

    Thoughts?
    Honestly I would say this: (assuming parts on car are in good shape - this doesn't mean super light weight, latest greatest or trickest, just good working solid parts)

    Best money spent is testing with someone knowledgeable, going over the car and then going to track to get the most out of what you have. This can show you where some of your issues are, whether it's equipment, driving, engine, or a number of things. This can pay huge dividends as well as lead you to what you need to work on next when money allows.

    I've said this before and will say again: If you never tested before, you will learn more in 5-8 hours testing then you will in 2 years of racing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    29

    Default

    I have been in your situation before, and I never wish to argue with people like billet, but I will say that if you are running mostly used tires, the one biggest thing that you can do to improve the car is to buy NEW right front tire evert race if possible. Buy a tire that will roll out in the 92-94 range, and once it has 2 nights racing on it, it is now you good and tempered rr. The right rear often takes alot of abuse, and I have seen many new rr tires blister on a track that has developed a black streak. If you are on 21's/1350's, check a new 21 with a durometer, it should check around 48. Check a 21 th that has one night of racing on it, and you will discover that new tires make a world of difference. If you cannot buy new tires every week, you should at least clean you old tires every week. When soft compound hoosier's hits cold mud, like under a caution, or when a car runs though damp track when exiting the track after a race, they tend to suck mud/sand into the grains of the hot tires, and the tire develops a cement type coating on the tire. I have seen hoosier 21 compound tires drop 20 durometer points just from a pressure wash. This is why you see the top teams grind their tires between track sessions, they are removing the glaze/mud. When we cannot afford new tires, we sipe our old tires 2 equal cuts diagonally and 2 equal cuts vertically.....IMHO this really helps the tire to start shedding old rubber. Lastly, at least one of the top 3 chassis companies(i will not call names, but it sounds like rapitol) encourages their drivers to use substances such as creasote on the tires. Well, at least they encourage this at tracks who are unlikely to pull tire samples. Creasote, and chemicals like it, do not penetrate into the tire compound, they simply stick on top of the tire, so chemicals like creasote will dramitlly improve the first 2-3 laps that you make, but they are very unlikely to show up on a tire test. If one want to learn alot about tire soaking, one should simply do a google search for go-kart tire prep. Most go kart classes allow almost unlimited tire prep.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Both good ideas. I was really leaning on new tires. I really take care of my tires. I pressure wash them, check tread depth and durometer them and grind them. The nights where I have had new right side tires, the car felt much better, like it was “in” the track more. Thanks for the ideas so far. Might have to see if I can get someone in my area that’s willing to help make improvements through testing, that has run a car of my vintage. And yes, the parts on the car are exactly as you described. Solid, excellent shape parts but not the latest, greatest stuff.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    163

    Default sell

    part out or sell your current car...there is currently a 09 updated to 12 Blue Front rocket with a set of Ohlins for sale on the classified section for $4g with spares. No idea who or where it is, but at least you can get in the ball park of current set ups and spring rates. Masters were brutal on ground clearance especially in the era of yours.

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