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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    492

    Default Bleeding Brinn Transmission

    I'm trying to pedal bleed a Brinn in a car that I bought used. Is there a trick I'm missing? Never had a Brinn. I bench bled the new master cyl. and bled it again on the car. Checked the line and it's routed with no high spots to trap air. Do I need to get a vacuum pump?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    1,083

    Default

    Shouldn't need one some times it helps to do a single pedal pump/ stroke per bleed cycle instead of pumping the pedal multiple times. I have also heard of guys removing the line and using a #2 pencil in the line as a check until they get fluid their. I've always had luck with single pump, hold pedal,open bleeder, close bleeder, release pedal and repeat.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jking24 View Post
    Shouldn't need one some times it helps to do a single pedal pump/ stroke per bleed cycle instead of pumping the pedal multiple times. I have also heard of guys removing the line and using a #2 pencil in the line as a check until they get fluid their. I've always had luck with single pump, hold pedal,open bleeder, close bleeder, release pedal and repeat.
    That's worked the best for me too. Another thing that works on the stubborn ones is after you tried bleeding a little and it's not working is to remove the master cylinder cap and slowly move the pedal with your hand while watching the fluid in reservoir. Only move the pedal a very small amount and release and see if you get bubbles come up upon release, if you do continue doing that until it stops. Then bleed the system once or twice at the bleeder and it usually works. Sometimes it's easier to bleed the air out the top of the master cylinder like I just described for some unknown reason.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    692

    Default

    I put a 1/4" rubber vacuum line over the bleeder screw and crack it open a 1/2 turn. Stick the other end of the hose into a container with enough fluid to cover the end of the hose by about an inch.
    Cycle the pedal slowly and give the pedal around 10 seconds to rest at the top of the stroke.

    If that isn't working, putting your finger over the bleeder screw to act a check valve. Fluid comes out, your finger keeps air from getting back in. It's messier.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    492

    Default

    Thank you for all the suggestions. I tried them all! I even filled an oil squirt can with fluid and tried to fill the system thru the bleeder valve. I think what actually did the trick was slowly engaging the pedal a small amount until the bubbles stopped coming out of fluid in master cylinder. I had done that yesterday but doing it a 2nd time i got more air out. I was ready to pull my hair out And I don't have any!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    3,585

    Default

    We took an old propane tank and turned it into an air tank. Then we cut off a small piece of a leaf spring drilled a hole in it and put an air fitting thru it along with a piece of rubber to act like a seal. Take the cap off the master cylinder, clamp the leaf spring piece where the cap went, open the air valve from the tank, and you have a homemade one man bleeder. Yep, it worked on bleeding brakes as well!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Just my two cents: In the past i have filled the master cylinder with fluid then let it gravity bleed out of the bleeder. Once you get some good fluid coming in close the bleeder then cycle the pedal a few times. Once the pedal has cycled I've just compressed the clutch pedal with a 2x4 and wedge it in so it holds the pedal at full swing. Ill typically leave it alone for a few hours or over night. I've never had an issue with doing that. Typically has full pedal right out of the gate once I come back to it. Granted I'm typically working alone so you have to make the most with what you have!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    692

    Default

    depending the MC you are using, I have an old one I drilled a 9/16 hole in it, fitted a tire valve, Then use a locking air chuck and apply 20psi to the MC, crawl under the car and open the bleeder. When the fluid comes out without air bubbles, it's all done. It'll take about 5 seconds or less.
    Something else to check, make sure the piston in the MC is retracting all the way. What can happen is the piston doesn't retract and uncover the hole and pulling fluid from the reservoir and replacing the air in the line. Sometimes the holes is covered by a plastic baffle so you may have to remove that too see the piston/seal.

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