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Thread: Brake lines

  1. #1

    Default Brake lines

    Whats the opinion on the plastic brake line kits, both push lock and compression fitting style. Looking for an easier way to do brake lines, absolutely hate a double flare tool, was considering going to a vise mounted one like eastwood sells, just pull A lever to make your flair.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    641

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    we have used both steel lines and the plastic driver say he could not feel any difference.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    420

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    I had the braided lined on a bwrc car I bought new. Came with a kit. All braided. Never good get a solid pedal. If you switched from 3 to 4 wheel. The first corner on 4 wheel was sketchy with the extra travel in the pedal all of a sudden.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Plastic is sketchy at best.
    Droop isn't the problem.

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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Wisconsin
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    I'm not a fan of plastic brake lines; spongy pedal; prone to heat damage. Steel brake lines should last you the life of the car if you take the time to route them properly. I love my lever-style Eastwood flare tool.
    If anyone is ever going to build more than a couple of cars, it's worth the investment. I've had leaky flares with the standard old screw type of flaring tools. I've never had a problem with the lever type.
    The biggest thing is to make sure the end is square and bur free after you cut the line I use a file and a drill bit (with my hands) to clean up the end before flaring.

  6. #6
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    May 2007
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    Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ltemodel View Post
    I'm not a fan of plastic brake lines; spongy pedal; prone to heat damage. Steel brake lines should last you the life of the car if you take the time to route them properly. I love my lever-style Eastwood flare tool.
    If anyone is ever going to build more than a couple of cars, it's worth the investment. I've had leaky flares with the standard old screw type of flaring tools. I've never had a problem with the lever type.
    The biggest thing is to make sure the end is square and bur free after you cut the line I use a file and a drill bit (with my hands) to clean up the end before flaring.
    On doing a flare: Agree with Kevin here (square on end and debur), but will add when you do the 2nd operation with the tapered wedge, DO NOT over tighten this part. Leaving extra compression available for the connected fitting to smash and seal will help a lot. 2nd would be to just use store bought length pieces (60" is the max length available) and just use unions if need longer to get from one place to another.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2008
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    thedirtysouth
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    I have not had my flaring tool out in years because I do exactly what billet is describing in his last sentence above....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    162

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    Just paid 180$ on Amazon for a Eastwood *style* flare tool.. did the whole car in less than an hour. So useful and easy.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Braided lines are plastic too with a SS outer fabric.
    I do plastic, change it every couple years. Be smart where you run it and tie it down well and it's never been an issue for me.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lizardracing View Post
    Braided lines are plastic too with a SS outer fabric.
    I do plastic, change it every couple years. Be smart where you run it and tie it down well and it's never been an issue for me.
    Yup. That's why a whole car with braid has a spongy pedal.
    Droop isn't the problem.

    Arizona Speedway - 2 ........ Brushcreek -1
    Alltech -1 ........ Eldora -4
    East Bay - 6
    Florence -1
    Atomic -4
    Tazewell -1
    Moler -1
    Portsmouth -1

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Macon GA
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    166

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    Longhorns from what IVe seen have aluminum brake lines with an AN fitting crimped on the end, no inverted flair anywhere. How do they do that? Custom made?

  12. #12
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    May 2007
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    Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burke1118 View Post
    Longhorns from what IVe seen have aluminum brake lines with an AN fitting crimped on the end, no inverted flair anywhere. How do they do that? Custom made?
    Your not talking about a flare nut on solid line?



    This is typically done on a single flare (not a double flare - folded over 45 degree flare) and it generally only on stainless steel as a lesser material will break from vibration and split at the start of the flare and leak. while it will work on aluminum line, it breaks easy and is a disaster waiting to happen.


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
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    1,174

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    I've never seen aluminum brake lines and the connection type that billet is describing is generally used for low pressure applications such as fuel line. It is not rated for high hydraulic pressure that brake lines see

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