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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Posts
    3

    Default 3-link anti squat

    Looking for some input on how anti squat is achieved in a 3-link rear end. My guess is more angle in the lower trailing arms or more compression on lr shock. My issues is with adding more angle to the lower bars, especially the left side, you will gain a push and tend to lift the left front tire. Less wedge needed if you run more angle in bars? Thanks for any input, trying to keep the car from squatting on the straightaway

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    636

    Default

    soft lr, set your limit chain so theres 1" or so compressed in the spring and set your lower bar 40*+ when its at droop

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Batavia, OH
    Posts
    12,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanders46 View Post
    Looking for some input on how anti squat is achieved in a 3-link rear end. My guess is more angle in the lower trailing arms or more compression on lr shock. My issues is with adding more angle to the lower bars, especially the left side, you will gain a push and tend to lift the left front tire. Less wedge needed if you run more angle in bars? Thanks for any input, trying to keep the car from squatting on the straightaway
    More shock compression isn't really anti-squat. It can keep it from dropping as fast when anti-squat is lost.

    Anything you do that results in a higher lr, under throttle, will make the LR carry more weight. This will make the car tighter on the throttle.

    To combat this, you can add static rr, add rr spring, move pullbar right. All of these have other consequences.
    Droop isn't the problem.

    Arizona Speedway - 2 ........ Brushcreek -1
    Alltech -1 .................... Eldora - 8
    East Bay - 6 .................. Richmond -1
    Florence -1 ................. Lawrenceburg -1
    Atomic -6 .................. Circle City -1
    Tazewell -1 .................. Mudlick-1
    Moler -4
    Portsmouth -3 .....................Tyler Co. -1

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thank you for the replies. So is left rear bar angle the true way to have anti squat? Have the spring right but from pst experience adding angle to the left rear makes car prone to lifting lf also. Aside from adding static right rear and adding rr spring, could I also add right rear bar angle? Seems like that would drive the right side of the car up, driving the left front down and also loosen the car back up after getting tight from adding left rear?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Batavia, OH
    Posts
    12,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanders46 View Post
    Thank you for the replies. So is left rear bar angle the true way to have anti squat? Have the spring right but from pst experience adding angle to the left rear makes car prone to lifting lf also. Aside from adding static right rear and adding rr spring, could I also add right rear bar angle? Seems like that would drive the right side of the car up, driving the left front down and also loosen the car back up after getting tight from adding left rear?
    Lr bar angle is lr anti squat. Rr bar angle is rr anti squat.

    When lr gets high enough, the lf is coming off the ground unless you get the rf lower or the rr higher.

    Keep in mind, if you get the rr too high off the spring, it's going to be a handful when you get to the corner.
    Droop isn't the problem.

    Arizona Speedway - 2 ........ Brushcreek -1
    Alltech -1 .................... Eldora - 8
    East Bay - 6 .................. Richmond -1
    Florence -1 ................. Lawrenceburg -1
    Atomic -6 .................. Circle City -1
    Tazewell -1 .................. Mudlick-1
    Moler -4
    Portsmouth -3 .....................Tyler Co. -1

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