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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default Rf spring location

    What affect has anyone he moving the rf spring in or out at lower control. Single spring rule deal thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Batavia, OH
    Posts
    12,154

    Default

    Moving in makes wheel rate softer and make control arm more likely to bend.
    Droop isn't the problem.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default

    So makes it roll more and yea I know it would bed easier

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Batavia, OH
    Posts
    12,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunterracing View Post
    So makes it roll more and yea I know it would bed easier
    Yes, it's just like putting a softer spring in the outside hole.
    Droop isn't the problem.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Could you run a little bit stiffer rate spring by moving it in to get drive back since canít run bumps or stacks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Also would it benift by moving the upper mount down some to increase roll with stiffer spring without having to do it by lead

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Batavia, OH
    Posts
    12,154

    Default

    Moving the mount down does not do anything. You can play with a arm mount location and spring rate all you want. Any combo that gives the same wheel rate is the same.

    If you need to defeat the no bump rule, use spring rubber if allowed.

    If not, I'd disconnect the upper coilover mount from the upper rail, hide a torsional spring inside, attach the mount to the torsional spring, preload it to the proper load where your spring binds, and use it for suspension. Seal the gaps with silicone and paint. It will look welded to an unsuspecting tech guy.
    Droop isn't the problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MasterSbilt_Racer View Post
    Moving the mount down does not do anything. You can play with a arm mount location and spring rate all you want. Any combo that gives the same wheel rate is the same.If you need to defeat the no bump rule, use spring rubber if allowed. If not, I'd disconnect the upper coilover mount from the upper rail, hide a torsional spring inside, attach the mount to the torsional spring, preload it to the proper load where your spring binds, and use it for suspension. Seal the gaps with silicone and paint. It will look welded to an unsuspecting tech guy.
    That's not even remotely gray. I like it lol

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MasterSbilt_Racer View Post
    Moving the mount down does not do anything. You can play with a arm mount location and spring rate all you want. Any combo that gives the same wheel rate is the same.

    If you need to defeat the no bump rule, use spring rubber if allowed.

    If not, I'd disconnect the upper coilover mount from the upper rail, hide a torsional spring inside, attach the mount to the torsional spring, preload it to the proper load where your spring binds, and use it for suspension. Seal the gaps with silicone and paint. It will look welded to an unsuspecting tech guy.
    Iím still trying wrap my head around the last comment lol

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    You would essentially be on a stacked rf setup yielding a softer initial rate and then when your coil over hit coil bind the shock mount would continue to hinge on a torsion bar giving you additional travel aswell as a progressive spring curve. And if the mount were positioned correctly you might even gain some balljoint to shock body clearance.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    286

    Default

    How the heck do you mount the torsion on the frame

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