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  1. #1

    Default Tire Wear Enhancement?

    if you want to actually make a hard tire show some wear instead of getting hot and then glazing, how would you approach the preparation? make smaller blocks which is also adding edges, or would you leave the blocks more larger and add sipes?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidewinder69 View Post
    if you want to actually make a hard tire show some wear instead of getting hot and then glazing, how would you approach the preparation? make smaller blocks which is also adding edges, or would you leave the blocks more larger and add sipes?
    A couple of questions:

    1. Is the tire glazing/sealing the only issue? (also assume it's on a caution but explain if not the case)
    2. Is the tire blistering anywhere on the tire?
    3. What tire exactly are you dealing with (1600, WRS, etc)?
    4. Is the tire way too hard for the conditions, meaning you would use a softer tire but not allowed by the tire rule?
    5. is the tire in question actually building temperature?
    6. Is the track abrasive?

  3. #3

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    yes because tire seems to fire off well then after some cautions it does not fire back up. it is a 1600 , no blistering in this situation . tire seems to be right because the surface is hard and clean so i assume the edges is best choice . track not abrasive

  4. #4
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    Kansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidewinder69 View Post
    yes because tire seems to fire off well then after some cautions it does not fire back up. it is a 1600 , no blistering in this situation . tire seems to be right because the surface is hard and clean so i assume the edges is best choice . track not abrasive
    From what your saying:

    There doesn't seem to be an over heating issue due to no signs of blistering, so additional grooves (least as far as cooling) isn't needed. Grooves are cooling and sipes are increasing heat, for the most part.

    So if your going to groove use small #1 or #2 grooves would be better then a wider groove which would allow more cooling if you want to make blocks smaller. Siping would be the better choice IMO as long your blocks aren't huge. I'm gonna assume you're not wearing off your sipes and thus shows up later in the race that the tire doesn't re-fire, if so go slightly deeper.

    The biggest thing is keeping the tires from cooling to fast and sealing up, you can definitely help the situation with cutting the tire but a big part is not allowing the tire to cool overly fast.

    #Note, the last part I meant as in keeping tires warm by weaving or spinning tires on the caution#

    Good luck

    As a vague general rule on harder compounds I like blocks to be around the 1" x 1" range for a minimum. So anything slight over the cubic 1" of area, like 1.25 x .75 or 1 x 1 or some variance of that to get around 1 square inch of area in each block. I change the groove width to adjust for cooling needed and if working "ON" the surface or "IN" the surface.

    Also sipes: I prefer to not cut a sipe too close to the edge of a block on the backside of the block or the inside/outside of the block (depending on if a left tire or right tire). Meaning if looking at the top of the RR tire with outer edge of tire to the right, then sipe would be close to the front of a block and more gap to the rear of the block. This keeps the last block from chunking to too little material behind it to keep it from flexing too much and chunking.

    Hope that last part makes sense without pictures
    Last edited by billetbirdcage; 08-13-2021 at 04:05 PM.

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